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Old 29th March 2009, 04:09 PM   #21 (permalink)
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Re: Clarification on the 5 Precepts

Originally Posted by Mingzhou78 View Post


We must remember that when someone commits suicide, he or she has not realised the Teachings of Buddha and in this case, has not realised the 4 sublime states of the mind, metta (loving kindess), karuna (compassion), mudita (sympathetic joy) or upekkha (equanimity). In specific, metta is the state of mind that should be stressed on.

Buddha taught that metta should be cultivated towards all beings just like the unconditional love that a mother has towards her only child where the life of her child is just as important to hers. When Buddha mentioned all beings, it includes ourself. We must not forget to love ourselves as equally as we love others. Here is a quote from Master Thich Nhat Hanh on the importance of self love.

"In taking good care of yourself, you take good care of your beloved one. Self-love is the foundation for your capacity to love the other person. If you don't take good care of yourself, if you are not happy, if you are not peaceful, you cannot make the other person happy. You cannot help the other person; you cannot love. Your capacity for loving another person depends entirely on your capacity for loving yourself, for taking care of yourself."

If one is to believe in rebirth, knowingly that committing suicide will only result in more suffering in the next rebrith, then in the spirit ot metta and self love, that itself can be one of the most valid reasons not to commit such an act.

Let's also not forget the benefits of metta. If we can cultivate ourselves constantly with metta, we will naturally be loving and generous in our actions. One of the many benefits of being generous and loving is that people around will naturally be attracted to you. Of these people, there are definitely some that will be worthy of your companionship, fostering a friendship that could last a lifetime providing the support that is not in anyway lesser than those that could be showered by your own family members.

I hope the answers are adequate. If there's any lacking, it is really due to my lack of wisdom and understanding of the Dhamma.
Thank you, Mingzhou78 for your detailed answers.

I have received similar or same advice from layman Buddhists in temples or Buddhist adult groups.

I have posed a question to these people:

What happens to people who have no idea what it means to be loved by people other than their parents? What happens if you can't develop metta in the shortest time possible, to such a level that you can feel naturally loving and generous?

By 'cant', I do not mean completely. I mean one may be so tortured by pain and clouded by delusion that ordinary methods of slowly cultivating metta would not provide quick and effective relief to his or her pain. Without that quick relief, he or she finds little motivation in continuing on.

If you see a person engulfed in flames, you don't say "Here is a pail of water, pour it on yourself". Of course, that person could do it on his own, but the natural compassionate response would be to react more quickly than the victim to pour water on him to extinguish the flames and provide instant relief to his pain.

Metta cultivation or meditation is very good, please do not misunderstand. However, the overtly strong self-reliance aspect of it is not for everyone who has his or her own unique mental and emotional burdens.

I have asked an elderly Buddhist, who's a working professional at the same time. We talked about having the common experience of being warmly received and guided by Christians when stepping in for the first time into their churches. However, this isn't really so for many Buddhist temples or organisations which cater to adults or youths. He agreed with my personal experiences.

He went on to say that the warmth shown by Christians were conditional in some ways and I said I understood what he meant (this is a personal sharing and does not reflect the views of the entire Buddhist community).

I went on to ask a direct or blunt question:

Then is the love shown by fellow Buddhists TRULY unconditional? He replied, "No", surprisingly without much hesitation.

Who can truly achieve unconditional and equal love for all? The Buddha himself.

Of course, this is not an excuse to forsake the cultivation of metta nor to dismiss the efforts of anyone who has already found peace and happiness after doing so.

I am trying to point out that unconditional love can truly and only be achieved when you have attained anicca or complete non-attachment to self. So you are either one of those who has achieved one of the 4 stages of Arahanthood, Bodhisattvahood or Buddhahood.

Any one who claims he or she has achieved unconditional love for all is most likely to be lying, or in the dark or denial about his or her own selfish ways in untested real life scenarios. There would be of course, some very select few that are close to achieving true unconditional love for all, but I seriously doubt I would have the good karmic fortune of meeting them and having their love and friendship.

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Last edited by s4bnw; 29th March 2009 at 04:14 PM.
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Old 30th March 2009, 04:11 AM   #22 (permalink)
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Re: Clarification on the 5 Precepts

Originally Posted by s4bnw View Post
Thank you, Mingzhou78 for your detailed answers.

I have received similar or same advice from layman Buddhists in temples or Buddhist adult groups.

I have posed a question to these people:

What happens to people who have no idea what it means to be loved by people other than their parents? What happens if you can't develop metta in the shortest time possible, to such a level that you can feel naturally loving and generous?

By 'cant', I do not mean completely. I mean one may be so tortured by pain and clouded by delusion that ordinary methods of slowly cultivating metta would not provide quick and effective relief to his or her pain. Without that quick relief, he or she finds little motivation in continuing on.

If you see a person engulfed in flames, you don't say "Here is a pail of water, pour it on yourself". Of course, that person could do it on his own, but the natural compassionate response would be to react more quickly than the victim to pour water on him to extinguish the flames and provide instant relief to his pain.

Metta cultivation or meditation is very good, please do not misunderstand. However, the overtly strong self-reliance aspect of it is not for everyone who has his or her own unique mental and emotional burdens.

I have asked an elderly Buddhist, who's a working professional at the same time. We talked about having the common experience of being warmly received and guided by Christians when stepping in for the first time into their churches. However, this isn't really so for many Buddhist temples or organisations which cater to adults or youths. He agreed with my personal experiences.

He went on to say that the warmth shown by Christians were conditional in some ways and I said I understood what he meant (this is a personal sharing and does not reflect the views of the entire Buddhist community).

I went on to ask a direct or blunt question:

Then is the love shown by fellow Buddhists TRULY unconditional? He replied, "No", surprisingly without much hesitation.

Who can truly achieve unconditional and equal love for all? The Buddha himself.

Of course, this is not an excuse to forsake the cultivation of metta nor to dismiss the efforts of anyone who has already found peace and happiness after doing so.

I am trying to point out that unconditional love can truly and only be achieved when you have attained anicca or complete non-attachment to self. So you are either one of those who has achieved one of the 4 stages of Arahanthood, Bodhisattvahood or Buddhahood.

Any one who claims he or she has achieved unconditional love for all is most likely to be lying, or in the dark or denial about his or her own selfish ways in untested real life scenarios. There would be of course, some very select few that are close to achieving true unconditional love for all, but I seriously doubt I would have the good karmic fortune of meeting them and having their love and friendship.
Hi s4bnw,

You have raised alot of valid points and questions. Ashamed to say, I am quite certain that i am definitely most insufficient to answer these questions. As each one of us undergo different experiences, each unique to its own, so most of the time, a lay person like myself will not be able to provide very good support or advice as my wisdom and metta is far from developed.

These are times when help should be sought from a well developed Master if possible. They will have a much better insight to the workings of the mind and their metta are much more developed. Only by tempering wisdom with love and love with wisdom, can the best intentions be realised with the best results achieved.

If you like and with your permission, i can try to contact Sister Sumitra who is assisting Bhante Ven Mahinda of Australia Aloka Meditation Centre and see if she would be able to address these questions. There have been times when they came to Singapore to conduct meditation retreats on metta at Kong Meng San and many have benefitted from them so Sister might be able to address your questions on metta better.

Meantime, here are some of my views and please be reminded that i not well versed in the dhamma and these points are brought up for discussion so all of us can grow in the path of wisdom, compassion and liberation.

When we have tasted the love of our parents and if our parents tries their best to be the best parents they can be to us, we have already tasted the some of greatest love in this world. Even if should they be distanced from us in anyway, be it physical actual distance or not, we should be mindful of the love they have already provided us and their only wish is for us to be well and happy. With that in mind, and if we are of a mind to requite this love that we have received (as it took no small kamma for them to become our parents in this life), we have to learn to love ourselves, to be well and happy as they would wished for us to be, all the more to stress on the importance of self love.

Again, here is the quote from Master Thich Nhat Hanh on the importance of self love that i previously mentioned.

"In taking good care of yourself, you take good care of your beloved one. Self-love is the foundation for your capacity to love the other person. If you don't take good care of yourself, if you are not happy, if you are not peaceful, you cannot make the other person happy. You cannot help the other person; you cannot love. Your capacity for loving another person depends entirely on your capacity for loving yourself, for taking care of yourself."

As for developing metta, most of us will find that it will be near impossible to develop it overnight to such unconditional love for all beings, we may not even be able to do it in this lifetime. Those who are able to are usually the ones who have in their previous lives cultivated great merits enabling them to be born in conditions where it allows them to do so. The rest of us will find that it is a lifetime (or even countless lifetimes) journey of cultivation. I am not suprised that when the elderly Buddhist mentioned that most Buddhist have conditional love as that was a question that i have repeatedly asked myself.

Most of us (including myself) have yet to perfect metta and our love are mostly conditioned. Hence the all the more reason why all of us here embark on this lifetime journey of learning and practice. We must always remember that happiness comes from within and not without. As an old Tibetan saying goes, "Seeking happiness outside ourselves is like waiting for sunshine in a cave facing north." All the more to cultivate self love. Based on my understanding, metta is usually generally developed in a few stages in the below sequence.

1) Love for ourselves
2) Love for someone we like
3) Love for someone we are neutral to
4) Love for someone we dislike

As for part on quick relief part to one's suffering and pain that you mentioned in the scenario - yes, quick relief can be provided by someone who pour the pail of water putting out the fire but what about the burns that the victim has already sufferred? Only the victim can bear his own pain and suffering during the phase of recovery. The road of recovery still very much depends on one to take proper care of oneself. The nurse can continually dress the wound but if the patient deliberately opens the wound again and again, it will not heal no matter how the nurse dresses it.

As such, it can be liken to this - the person suffering, the people (families, friends, communities and Sangha) around him or her can provide immediate relief, support, concern and care making one feel better but this is temporarily. Ultimately, one has to realise that true happiness comes from within and not externally. So, if he or her continually dwell on his or her pain and do not break off from this vicious cycle, then no matter how much relief and support is provided, one is likely to be still trapped within. Both must work hand in hand for the best results, self determination to be well and happy and support from the communities, lacking of either will make it very much harder although we cannot say it is impossible. I remembered Master Sheng Yen once mentioned that pain is unavoidable in life but suffering is not and suffering is our mentality towards pain.

I hope more can help to address these points and questions that s4bnw has raised as these are truly valid questions which deserves our attention.

with metta


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Old 30th March 2009, 11:13 AM   #23 (permalink)
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Re: Clarification on the 5 Precepts

Originally Posted by Mingzhou78 View Post


As for part on quick relief part to one's suffering and pain that you mentioned in the scenario - yes, quick relief can be provided by someone who pour the pail of water putting out the fire but what about the burns that the victim has already sufferred? Only the victim can bear his own pain and suffering during the phase of recovery. The road of recovery still very much depends on one to take proper care of oneself. The nurse can continually dress the wound but if the patient deliberately opens the wound again and again, it will not heal no matter how the nurse dresses it.

As such, it can be liken to this - the person suffering, the people (families, friends, communities and Sangha) around him or her can provide immediate relief, support, concern and care making one feel better but this is temporarily. Ultimately, one has to realise that true happiness comes from within and not externally. So, if he or her continually dwell on his or her pain and do not break off from this vicious cycle, then no matter how much relief and support is provided, one is likely to be still trapped within. Both must work hand in hand for the best results, self determination to be well and happy and support from the communities, lacking of either will make it very much harder although we cannot say it is impossible. I remembered Master Sheng Yen once mentioned that pain is unavoidable in life but suffering is not and suffering is our mentality towards pain.

I hope more can help to address these points and questions that s4bnw has raised as these are truly valid questions which deserves our attention.

with metta

Yes, indeed the victim has to bear his or her own pain and suffering. I have no doubts about that.

However, helping people who continue to dwell on their pain, to develop the unshakeable will to face life's challenges and the heart to seek and accept sincere help from others, is to me, a true exercise of great compassion and wisdom.

I would rather admit that my compassion and wisdom is limited than to merely ignore or abandon the person who continues to dwell on his or her pain.

Parental love is on a different level than those shown by say, friends or your spouses and children. If parental love alone is sufficient, than no one needs to get married and no one needs to have friends.

Indeed, ultimately, love comes from within. However, for most of us who are unenlightened, this is a truth that cannot be reached or realised without skillful means of compassion and wisdom shown by others, Buddhists or not.

Again, this is something that most books on metta or most revered meditation masters has not been able to address adequately for me.

Thank you for your detailed and honest sharing.

If you don't mind the trouble, please ask Sister Sumitra on my behalf and post her answers in a new thread in this forum. I don't intend to contact her personally. You can forward relevant thread exchanges between us to her if you like.

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Last edited by s4bnw; 30th March 2009 at 11:16 AM.
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Old 3rd April 2009, 07:24 PM   #24 (permalink)
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Re: Clarification on the 5 Precepts

Sorry to jump in. But can anyone point me to an article which explains the nature and types of karma?

Thank you.

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Old 3rd April 2009, 07:51 PM   #25 (permalink)
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Re: Clarification on the 5 Precepts

Originally Posted by neekgeek View Post
Sorry to jump in. But can anyone point me to an article which explains the nature and types of karma?

Thank you.
http://www.suanmokkh.org/archive/art...age/kamma1.htm

http://www.buddhanet.net/budsas/ebud/ebdha057.htm

http://www.dharmaweb.org/index.php/W...daw_U_Thittila

http://web.singnet.com.sg/~sidneys/kamma.htm

http://www.buddhistebooks.com/eBooks...onOfKamma.html

These are some links I have just searched from the internet. If you wish to comment or ask anything further, please start a new thread.

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Old 4th April 2009, 05:02 PM   #26 (permalink)
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Re: Clarification on the 5 Precepts

Okay, thank you very much s4bnw.

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Old 9th August 2013, 10:56 AM   #27 (permalink)
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Re: Clarification on the 5 Precepts

Within Buddhism alot of us we ask questions specifically when know the answers the moment we ask ourselves, as my boss a Confucian-ist once told me "Be true to myself". Some difficult questions in life it's very difficult to go into such details, and when we try to be a lawyer ourselves going into such details, we notice inevitably these days that lawyers in Singapore or across the globe are paid high salaries to scrunitise at what we even ate yesterday night. It's barely about what's right and wrong here, if we are gonna go back to the Buddhist five precepts as prescribed by the Buddha, you notice that the precepts (sila) are part of the path originally rather than the intended outcome. In other words, when any follower (or even non-followers) follow the Buddhist five precepts very very strictly, at the end of the day whether within 7 days or 7 weeks it's supposed to give rise to a certain form of (concentration) samadhi as well, and of course a certain degree of (wisdom) prajna. What's important here again is that in the event one abides by the practices of sravakayana and more specifically dependent origination and cessation, with all these factors of the path made strong and effectual, one can also experience a certain degree of bliss, joy, rapture, emancipation, and yeah the good'o enlightenment that we all have been discussing since 2500 years ago.

Okay that's buddhish, theravadish, dogmatical, and requires one's own practice to effectuate and discern for oneself. You try to relate to what the Buddha said 2500 years ago, and we always know that as a toddler it's sometimes easier for him/her to practise the five precepts than an old and sick man. Both are in dukkha that's for sure. Birth is dukkha, aging is dukkha, sickness is dukkha, yada yada. Yet, an adolescent is by nature frail in the sense that he/she is in incapable in the first place of holding a bow and arrow and killing an elephant. On the contrary, when an old person has lived for 50 years on this planet and having seen enough, (instead of trying to stereotype one age group) the precepts become slightly more difficult to obey. The eyes are less clear. The mind is less lucid. The limbs are less agile. I myself when I was 20 years old find it easier to obey precepts than when I am 30 years old. Each day I carry on, my back aches, my neck aches, my arms aches, it's a different form of challenge.

As far as precepts are concerned in the modern day then, you take a look at Thich Nhat Hanh of Plum Village and you notice how he often has to discourse about the precepts in a manner that is in his own lineage and upbringing. He came from life as a young monk during the Vietnam War. He sees people getting bombed and killed, his own race, his own civilians, his own countryman. Then he has gotta go to France (the first country that Vietnam went to war with in 20th century) set up a sangha there and teach young European teens how to stop killing ordinary people like their forefathers used to.

The anger is definitely there in certain Viet followers who lost their kins and kiths in the war. Then again, you try and ask them for instance to obey specific Buddhish precepts like "No killing" and the way down to "No Intoxicating". All these can be done, then again who are we trying to kid in a world with satellites scrutinising down at us from thousands of feet above our heads? 2500 years ago when much of India relied on the Buddha and Boddhisattvas miracle feats, the Buddha's vinaya for sangha included no masturbation. Masturbation i.e. the intentional discharge of seminal fluid is considered unwholesome for a monastic in His sangha. Even till today monastics alot still fall back to the same set of vinaya. Then again you take a look at Ajahn Brahm for instance, he used to practise in a Thai Forest. The lay people offered him and Ajahn Chah curry with boiled frogs. They are in the jungle, ya know, there are only frogs available. Can they eat frogs? Did they kill frogs? By right they abstained. They took what was given. Maybe that's all that matters. Living simply in the Thai forests, they took what was given. These days Ajahn Brahm conducts conferences in Thai five star resorts, that ain't for me to judge how many dinosaurs had to die for the air-conditioning to get turned on.

I don't know what is the a "right" precept. I won't understand what "wrong" actions are. Today is National Day, Sir Stamford Raffles with East India Company were manipulative politicking bastards in one way or another when they founded Singapore City in early 1800s. When the founding fathers helped Singapore achieve autonomy subsequently independence, even till today we are still leeching (ahem buying) raw fresh water cheaply from Malaysia and selling treated water back to them -- did anybody leave their tap accidentally turned on today -- there's bad karma everywhere when one even forget to offer incense to one's ancestors this morning.

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Old 3rd September 2013, 11:14 PM   #28 (permalink)
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Re: Clarification on the 5 Precepts

Originally Posted by quietfight View Post
I seek clarification on 3 of the 5 Precepts, please:
This is a somewhat yesteryear talk by Venerable Guang Chao on the Three Refuges and Five Precepts http://v.youku.com/v_show/id_XNjA0NDIwMjk2.html

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Old 16th September 2013, 08:19 AM   #29 (permalink)
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Re: Clarification on the 5 Precepts

Originally Posted by BeAwake View Post
I can't remember the name of the sutra. But it's a very famous story.

Here's a reference:

http://www.blia.org/english/publicat...t/pages/08.htm

Sixth, would the Buddha lie?


Would the Buddha lie? This is indeed a very serious question. How do we dare to say that the Buddha would lie? The Five Precepts of abstaining from killing, stealing, sexual misconduct, false speech, and intoxicants are very important precepts. Lying is a form of false speech! How could the Buddha lie? This is because the Dharma is dynamic. If the acts of killing, stealing, sexual misconduct, false speech, and taking intoxicants are committed out of greed, hatred, and delusions, they are indeed very severe violations of these important precepts. If the violations are performed out of compassion, then they constitute another form of the Bodhisattva Way. Take the example of a sociopath who, wielding knives and guns, is on a rampage to kill many innocent people. What are we supposed to do? Do we just stand by and watch him destroy the lives of innocent people? Of course not. Sometimes, out of compassion to save the many innocent victims, we may have to first kill the sociopath. This is markedly different from killing someone out of hatred. Let us say that I found out you were plotting to gun down another person, or try to do harm with poison, and I tried to conceal the gun or the poison. Would you say that as this involves stealing, that I should not try to conceal the weapon and just let him commit the murder? Under these circumstances, the Buddha would use his wisdom to handle the situations in special ways.

Once while the Buddha was meditating in the woods, it happened that a rabbit was shot by a hunter. The rabbit ran to the Buddha and hid under his robe. The hunter who was chasing the rabbit stopped to ask the Buddha, "Did you see my rabbit?"

Of course, the Buddha saw the rabbit, but he could not tell the hunter where the rabbit was. So, the Buddha replied, "No, I haven't seen the rabbit."

Is this a lie?

"You have hid my rabbit, my dinner for the night. Can you please return it to me?"

"Oh, it was for your dinner tonight!" The Buddha then pulled the knife he had with him, and he asked the hunter, "If I cut off my arm, is it enough to compensate you for the rabbit? Let me give you my arm for your dinner!"

In order to save sentient beings, the Buddha told a fib out of great, fearless compassion. This is not an everyday lie. This is in accordance with what is said in the Diamond Sutra, "The Tathagata is one who speaks of things as they are, as what is true, and as in accordance with reality."

Once when the Buddha was cultivating his practice in a past life as a bodhisattva, he chanced to run into a bandit who was about to rob and kill five hundred merchants passing by. When the Buddha found this out, he killed the bandit without any hesitation. In the mind of the Buddha, he would rather accept the bad karma of taking a life than letting five hundred innocent people lose their lives. The Buddha would not lie to deceive others, but the Buddha also would weigh the different sides of the issue before acting accordingly.
Hey just an update: I no longer hold the view that Buddha is able to lie at all, even white lies. I think this story about Buddha lying to save the rabbit is itself a fabricated story. There is no example in the scriptures that actually depict Buddha as allowing white lie - he is quite strict about not lying.

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Old 12th January 2014, 02:35 AM   #30 (permalink)
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Re: Conventional Truth and 5 Precepts

Originally Posted by BeAwake View Post
I can't remember the name of the sutra. But it's a very famous story.

Here's a reference:

http://www.blia.org/english/publicat...t/pages/08.htm

Sixth, would the Buddha lie?


Would the Buddha lie? This is indeed a very serious question. How do we dare to say that the Buddha would lie? The Buddha would not lie to deceive others, but the Buddha also would weigh the different sides of the issue before acting accordingly.

Thank You Dharma Brothers Sisters for your immensely timeless spiritual insight!

Each and every living beings, human and otherwise primal domestic pets, deserve our needs fulfilled. One with pets know of close affection pets share with extended family and knowing that your pet is family, just the thought of a pet in trouble is close to bringing you tears. You and every other person is very related in some way, not a blooded link though you and I share our common desire to live fully in a life so imperfect.

Appreciative for efforts of others at work, and earlier, schooling, furthered our work objectives and numerous others along with I engaged service volunteerism and opened a service career for us out at near future. You reap as you sow, again one day as you later chanced upon this post, you already gained awareness of the way of living fully and you are, too, ready for living fully with others and engaging yourself to spiritual needs.

You bring your moony self from bed, turning over the morning alarm, you toss your slouchy cotton to office straights, delightfully you greet newspaper man, whistling deli lady bringing over her extra coffee, and very quietly you hum yourself 'It's A Wonderful Day' Michael Buble and unfortunately 'Bad Day' Daniel Powter those other uneventful times, you very quickly engage your senses and you very mindfully awake to another beginning.

The way of living fully is a fulfillment of needs and do you see that the Buddha provisioned Dharma practitioners the 5 Precepts not only as spiritual reminders perhaps but also a guideline of practical and very mindful living:
• To refrain from taking life of others
• To refrain from taking belongings of others and what is not given
• To refrain from behaving out of wishes of others and sexual misconduct
• To refrain from speaking out of wishes of others and incorrect speech (i.e., lying, gossiping, uncourteous, divisive, etc.)
• To refrain from behaving out of moderate living and intoxicating oneself
(Retrieved 12 Jan, 2013: http://viewonbuddhism.org/resources/Buddhist-Book-of-
Numbers.htm)

Thich Nhat Hanh renowned and notable spiritual leader also provide spiritual perspective:
1. Aware of the suffering caused by the destruction of life, I vow to cultivate compassion and to learn the ways of protecting the lives of people, animals and plants. I am determined not to kill, not to let others kill, and not to condone any act of killing in the world, in my thinking, and in my way of life.

2. Aware of the suffering caused by exploitation, social injustice, stealing and oppression, I vow to cultivate loving-kindness and learn ways to work for the well-being of people, animals and plants. I vow to practice generosity by sharing my time, energy, and material resources with those who are in real need. I am determined not to steal and not to possess anything that should belong to others. I will respect the property of others, but I will do everything in my power to prevent others from human suffering of other species.

3. Aware of the suffering caused by sexual misconduct, I vow to cultivate my responsibility and learn ways to protect the safety and integrity of individuals, couples, families and society. I am determined not to engage in sexual relations without love and long-term commitment. To preserve the happiness of myself and others, I am determined to respect my commitments and the commitments of others. I will do everything in my power to protect children from sexual abuse and to protect families from being broken by sexual misconduct.

4. Aware of suffering caused by unmindful speech and the inability to listen to the suffering of others, I vow to cultivate loving speech and deep listening in order to bring joy and happiness to others and relieve others of their suffering. Knowing that words can create happiness or bring suffering, I vow to learn to speak truthfully, with words that can inspire self confidence, joy and hope. I am determined not to spread news that I do not know to be certain, and not to criticize or condemn things I am not sure of . I will refrain from uttering words that can cause division or discord, or that can cause the family or the community to break. I willmake every effort to reconcile and resolve all conflicts, even small.

5. Aware of the suffering caused by unmindful consumption, I vow to cultivate good health, both physical and mental, for myself, my family, and my society by practicing mindful eating, drinking, and consuming. I vow to ingest only items that preserve peace, well-being and joy in my body, in my consciousness, and in the collective body and consciousness of my family and society. I am determined not to use alcohol or any other intoxicants, or to ingest foods or other items that contain toxins, such as certain T.V. programs, magazines, books, films and conversations. I am aware that to damage my body and my consciousness with these poisons is to betray my ancestors, my parents, my society, and future generations. I will work to transform violence, fear, anger, and confusion by practicing a diet for myself and for society. I understand that a proper diet is crucial for self-transformation, and for the transformation of society.
(Retrieved 12 Jan, 2013: http://web.archive.org/web/200706081...en/precept.htm)

May all beings soar a greater 2014 ahead! Take care of your spiritual needs and senses

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