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Old 7th June 2013, 03:54 PM   #1 (permalink)
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LTA seeks feedback on COEs, car ownership

LTA seeks feedback on COEs, car ownership

SINGAPORE — The Land Transport Authority (LTA) is seeking views from the public on whether and how the Certificate of Entitlement (COE) and car ownership frameworks should be refined.

It is responding to public feedback that luxury cars are creeping into Category (Cat) A of the COE framework.

In a statement, LTA noted that in recent years, car models generally viewed as luxury cars have become more common in Cat A, which was originally meant for mass-market cars. The luxury models have significantly higher open market value (OMV) and engine power than those in the mass market.

LTA said that it is reviewing how it could refine the COE categorisation.

On multiple car ownership, LTA has noted the feedback that, given the limited number of COEs available, individuals owning more than one car could deprive others of the chance to own a car.

It is inviiting the public to submit ideas and suggestions on the above two issues through a survey at its web portal from June 7 till July 7.

LTA said it is also conducting focus group discussions with members of the public, and that it has started seeking suggestions and ideas from the motor industry and academics.

The authority said it will consolidate and assess the suggestions that it receives, and give an update later in the year.

Source: http://www.todayonline.com/singapore...-car-ownership

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Old 7th June 2013, 04:24 PM   #2 (permalink)
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Re: LTA seeks feedback on COEs, car ownership

there is going to be extensive talk, after that they will separate luxury cars from cat A COE and make them pay more for COE. Pay and Pay is always the solution.

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Old 7th June 2013, 05:08 PM   #3 (permalink)
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Re: LTA seeks feedback on COEs, car ownership

For sure the prices of COE will be one of the highlights

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Old 10th June 2013, 10:36 AM   #4 (permalink)
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How to move away from COE system

How to move away from COE system

FROM
CHEW ENG SOO


On our small island, a car is mostly not needed unless it is a tool of trade, in which case the person who needs it would likely be compensated by his company to own and use a car.

Having said that, if the Certificate of Entitlement (COE) system has to be changed to better meet the aspirations of various levels of our society, then I propose it be abolished, along with the Additional Registration Fee.

In its place, we could introduce a system where a person purchasing a car must buy one or three years of mileage allowance, which would be deducted via a satellite system or Electronic Road Pricing gantry, depending on the hour and area of use.

Usage during peak hours and to the Central Business District would be charged heavily, with minimal deductions for usage during non-peak hours and in non-congested areas. The cost differential versus public transport could be a factor of 10 or more.

If one uses up the allowance earlier, one then buys another one or three years of mileage, which could be set at, say, S$10,000 to S$20,000 per annum. It could be carried forward if unused.

The key is to make cars cheaper to buy but not to use. Road congestion would likely be reduced, as usage would be based more on needs due to the high cost. The less well-off could buy a small car, while the rich would not feel that they are being denied the fruits of their success.

This would motivate all to work hard, a fundamental value in our society. And while there is no perfect way if a change is desired, such a proposal is more likely to be win-win for all stakeholders.

Source: http://www.todayonline.com/voices/ho...way-coe-system

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Old 11th June 2013, 07:48 AM   #5 (permalink)
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A COE balloting system will achieve social equity

A COE balloting system will achieve social equity

FROM
GOH KIAN HUAT


I refer to the report “LTA seeks public feedback on refining COE system” (June 8).

The Monetary Authority of Singapore has re-introduced financing restrictions on motor vehicle loans granted by financial institutions since Feb 26, with the objective of encouraging financial prudence among buyers of motor vehicles and reduce inflationary pressure caused by the high prices of Certificates of Entitlement (COEs).

Unfortunately, its effectiveness in bringing down premiums appears to be very limited. COE prices for cars remain high at S$65,000 to S$75,000.

Transport Minister Lui Tuck Yew said the Government is considering ways to make the vehicle quota system more socially equitable. This is a deviation from the original objective of using the system to regulate the growth of vehicle population.

As long as the system is based on bidding, with success going to the bidders who are willing to pay more, the rich will always be in a better position and social equity in car ownership will never be achieved.

In my opinion, it is futile to impose a surcharge for an individual or a household who owns more than one car as generally, they are the ones who are financially better off and can afford the additional charges. The rich will still always have multiple cars.

In addition, efforts to define the characteristics of a mass market car and re-classify the COE categories will be wasted if premiums remain ridiculously high after the refinement. This was the case in the exercise to remove taxis from the need to bid for a COE under Category A — there was little impact on premiums.

Thus, the objective of the COE review should be to bring down premiums significantly.

This can be done by replacing the current bidding system with a balloting process, with successful applicants paying only a nominal fee, for example. This will enable more average people to own a car and, hence, achieve social equity.

Source: http://www.todayonline.com/voices/co...-social-equity

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Old 12th June 2013, 10:57 AM   #6 (permalink)
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COEs and urban planning: Time to think big and bold

COEs and urban planning: Time to think big and bold

By
Devadas Krishnadas


The Certificate of Entitlement (COE) system was first introduced to control demand for private vehicles and to serve the larger goal of keeping traffic flow efficient.

With land becoming increasingly scarce, adjustments to vehicle-related taxes need to be seen in the context of the larger challenge of land scarcity. This challenge is made more difficult by a more demanding travelling public and greater cynicism over the structure and performance of public transport.

How should this challenge be met and the difficulties moderated?

First, the Government could use the COE system to push multiple policy objectives while at the same time simplifying the system.

Rather than merely control demand, it could create one category for low carbon emission vehicles such as electric and hybrid cars, and those with CNG-fuelled engines.

The flow of available quota could be biased towards this category.

If we allow a certain minimum volume of private vehicles, amplify the benefits by requiring them to be more climate-friendly.

All other vehicles, regardless of engine capacity, could be treated as a single class with the applicable quota progressively reduced over time. If the rich bid high resulting in expensive cars crowding out cheaper cars, the premium paid by them could go to subsidising public transport.

RADICAL RETHINKING IN URBAN PLANNING

Second, the Government could incentivise the shift of travel load towards public transport by ensuring reliability, capacity and distribution. In addition, it should make travel more affordable for frequent travellers and more comfortable for all travellers.

Affordability could be improved by introducing monthly and sector pass schemes as an option for regular travellers. Such schemes reward those who travel frequently with discounted fares. Schemes such as these have been successful in public transport systems in major cities such as London.

Aesthetically, more effort could be made to green all stations to reduce the harshness of the industrial design. Psychological studies have shown that greenery can reduce stress, something which has risen for the travellers in recent years. It also has the added benefit of reducing ambient temperature.

Third, the traffic population and flow challenge could also involve radical rethinking in urban planning. The Central Business District (CBD) could be zoned for public transport only. Large park-and-ride spaces could be provided at nodes on the perimeter of the CBD for those who wish to mix their travel modes. Short commuter lines could be provided between these park-and-ride spaces and the CBD to supplement the main trunk bus or rail lines.

The Government could also significantly upgrade its planning intentions for the distribution of commercial offices. Currently, the plans call for the addition of a handful of small commercial areas in the suburbs. However, it needs to consider a more ambitious plan for a second full-fledged CBD in the north-west to create a balancing polarity for human traffic flow with the existing CBD in the south. There would be proximity to and spillover effects from the future growth in the Iskandar economic region and the eventual high-speed rail link to Kuala Lumpur.

MAINTAINING TRUST

Fourth, it is important to review the concept of public transport to reconcile misconceptions and reduce public angst. This angst has not been helped by signals from Mr Desmond Kuek, Chief Executive Officer of SMRT, that public operators are finding the current model “unsustainable”, thus raising the unpopular spectre of further injections of public monies into operations of these publicly listed corporations.

In the mind of the layman, public transport implies services funded by tax revenue for his or her transport needs without a profit motive. However, our model is a private operator model with a profit motive. This can irritate the layman who feels that he is being taken for a ride in more ways than one.

However, what he misses is that as the Government is a significant shareholder in the private operators, all citizens are thus also beneficiaries, albeit in a convoluted way, of any profits.

The Government transport plan will be completed only in 2030. Between now and then, optically, bearing in mind potential disruption from construction and continued pressure from population, the layman will conclude that things are getting worse rather than better. It is vital that the Government maintains the trust of the public in its management of such national yet “bread-and-butter” issues as public transport.

ALTERNATIVES TO STATUS QUO

There are three options to pacify the natural concerns of the travelling citizen.

One option would be to use the regulatory mechanism to ensure higher standards and efficiency from public operators.

This is the current mode, where the hope is that if these standards are achieved, the public, being satisfied with the experience of travel on public transport, will be less concerned with industry structure.

A second option would be to nationalise public transport. This would resolve entirely the seeming inconsistency in the mind of the layman. However, before doing so, it must be demonstrable that significant public benefit would be derived. It is not clear that this would be the case.

Indeed, the commitment of large sums of scarce public monies to nationalise publicly listed operators will come at huge opportunity costs and impose considerable fiscal pressure on the public purse.

Despite the attractive simplicity of the nationalisation option, it is very possible that it may prove a very expensive red herring.

A third option would be consolidation. It is timely to review the assumed benefits of privatisation and competition. If adjustments to the status quo are insufficient, and nationalisation too radical, then consolidation should be studied as the third alternative to the status quo. It may bring operating efficiencies, simplified decision processes and benefits from economies of scale.

MAKING IT ALL WORK

Muddied together with public concern on the structure of public transport is the public interest in boosting social safety nets. However, these are not questions of industry structure or infrastructure but of social safety net policy.

Government communications need to encourage the public to understand that any policy choice in the transport fee space cannot be treated in isolation. This is a general principle of governance rather than just as an issue in transport.

Land and transport management have to be seen as a system and it must be generally accepted that systemic change is difficult and takes time.

On the one hand, the Government must have the will to make trade-offs and boldness of vision to deal with challenges at the systemic level.

On the other hand, the public needs to manage expectations, adapt to a heavier reliance on public transport and accept that the attendant costs to improvements must be financed, even if partly, through public revenue.

These are the realities of the post-modernisation of Singapore as we enter into the second half-century of independence.

To make it all work, we need to change our minds before we change our infrastructure. The first may prove the harder of the two unavoidable adjustments.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Devadas Krishnadas is the Founder and Director of Future-Moves. He is also the Editor of IPS Commons.

Source: http://www.todayonline.com/commentar...k-big-and-bold

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Old 12th June 2013, 11:03 AM   #7 (permalink)
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Re: LTA seeks feedback on COEs, car ownership

The forecast plan fail and they have meet the dead end, no U-turn or reverse.

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