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Old 18th February 2010, 01:24 PM   #1 (permalink)
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questions!!!! japanese language.

Ive just started my lessons at JCS, the beginner one,
just want to ask,
why are some words in full katakana while some are a mixture of hira and kana?
and and.
When do we use full kana / full hira?
When is kana used???????
then.... why some words right, there's no kanji to it???

X.X confused.
would appreciate some help! lol!

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Old 18th February 2010, 02:19 PM   #2 (permalink)
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Re: questions!!!! japanese language.

hiragana used for japanese words and particles.
katakana used for foreign loan words. [for example カード (ka-do) = card]
kanji are just chinese symbols.. well most words have at least one kanji...
like taberu (eat) = 食べる even though it can be written in hiragana alone たべる...
sometimes when reading english, you don't read letters by letters but just scan through and you know the meaning right?
same for japanese lah, with kanji, it's much easier to scan through and know the meaning.
but some words are just without kanji, or rather it is normally written just with the hiragana, so yea.
In every japanese passage you'd most likely to encounter all three scripts anyway.

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Old 18th February 2010, 11:16 PM   #3 (permalink)
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Re: questions!!!! japanese language.

Just to add on to aforl's reply, the line between what's foreign and what's not is blurring. Maybe it's the influence of manga, where they like to use katakana to emphasize like how we use CAPITAL letters in English.

Also, kanji was imported by the Japanese from the Chinese back in the time before hiragana/katakana were invented. If you see ancient Japanese scripts, it will probably look like ancient Chinese scripts. Hiragana/katakana is like our Hanyu Pinyin for Chinese. Generally, everything can be written using hiragana, like in children's books, but it'll be difficult to read and make sense of. Imagine I give you a Chinese news article written in Hanyu Pinyin, with no spaces some more!

As for which written script to use, some words come more often in certain forms than others, like tabaco (cigarette) is commonly written in either hiragana or katakana, but not as kanji even though it has kanji characters as well.

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Old 19th February 2010, 11:46 AM   #4 (permalink)
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Re: questions!!!! japanese language.

Originally Posted by JCMaths View Post

As for which written script to use, some words come more often in certain forms than others, like tabaco (cigarette) is commonly written in either hiragana or katakana, but not as kanji even though it has kanji characters as well.
ohh!!~
means..
I have to read more Japanese to actually know right, the different forms for each characters.....
sugoi.

hm. oh! and..
the first vocab sheet that my teacher gave me,
some full words in kana, there's no kanji for them?
is it the same for all kana words?
or are there exceptional cases. lol!

beansproutbun added 3 Minutes and 5 Seconds later...

Originally Posted by aforl View Post
katakana used for foreign loan words. [for example カード (ka-do) = card]
just like notebook = no~to ?
hm..
gues i'll rlly need more practice. T_T
oh!
so for kana,
its used for foreign loan words and for emphasis, right?

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Old 19th February 2010, 03:50 PM   #5 (permalink)
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Re: questions!!!! japanese language.

Originally Posted by beansproutbun View Post
ohh!!~
means..
I have to read more Japanese to actually know right, the different forms for each characters.....
sugoi.

hm. oh! and..
the first vocab sheet that my teacher gave me,
some full words in kana, there's no kanji for them?
is it the same for all kana words?
or are there exceptional cases. lol!
Yes, usually words in katakana have no kanji, or at least the kanji is so obscure that 99.99% of the Japanese people themselves don't know the kanji exists, like the tabako example I gave. It is definitely not important at all for you to know this type of kanji.

Whatever vocabulary you learn in class, just learn it together with the written script used. It's like when you learn a new English word, you should learn the spelling too. There may be other variations, but if you're not taught in class, it is not necessary for you to know them. Just memorize it as it is in your notes/textbook and it should suffice.

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Old 20th February 2010, 11:52 AM   #6 (permalink)
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Re: questions!!!! japanese language.

Originally Posted by JCMaths View Post
Yes, usually words in katakana have no kanji, or at least the kanji is so obscure that 99.99% of the Japanese people themselves don't know the kanji exists, like the tabako example I gave. It is definitely not important at all for you to know this type of kanji.

Whatever vocabulary you learn in class, just learn it together with the written script used. It's like when you learn a new English word, you should learn the spelling too. There may be other variations, but if you're not taught in class, it is not necessary for you to know them. Just memorize it as it is in your notes/textbook and it should suffice.
ah!
THANKS!
That rlly helped. ^_^
hope i wont die halfway through my learning. LOL

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Old 20th February 2010, 02:27 PM   #7 (permalink)
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Re: questions!!!! japanese language.

You're welcome =) Enjoy your learning process!

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Old 22nd February 2010, 03:59 PM   #8 (permalink)
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Re: questions!!!! japanese language.

Originally Posted by JCMaths View Post
You're welcome =) Enjoy your learning process!
was eating banana, this qns suddenly came to me.
is banana written in full katakana?
LOL.

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Old 22nd February 2010, 04:39 PM   #9 (permalink)
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Re: questions!!!! japanese language.

Originally Posted by beansproutbun View Post
was eating banana, this qns suddenly came to me.
is banana written in full katakana?
LOL.
yep, banana is a not a native to japan, but foreign, so it's written in katakana.
バナナ.

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Old 22nd February 2010, 06:28 PM   #10 (permalink)
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Re: questions!!!! japanese language.

Originally Posted by xdarkx111 View Post
yep, banana is a not a native to japan, but foreign, so it's written in katakana.
バナナ.
ah!! ^_^
OKAY! thank you!
and.......
is there such a sentence,
kitto daijoubu ne. (its certainly alright)
?
and.............
during a conversation, some words may be omitted right? like the last word of a certain word(omg i hope you can understand)
lol!
one last question.
when writting Japanese right, notice that there are some spaces in between the letters?
when to leave a space and when not to? the commas they use unlike the standard eigo one's, " , " its facing the other direction? ( noticed it in the worksheets i've been doing.

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Old 22nd February 2010, 08:40 PM   #11 (permalink)
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Re: questions!!!! japanese language.

Originally Posted by beansproutbun View Post
ah!! ^_^
OKAY! thank you!
and.......
is there such a sentence,
kitto daijoubu ne. (its certainly alright)
?
and.............
during a conversation, some words may be omitted right? like the last word of a certain word(omg i hope you can understand)
lol!
one last question.
when writting Japanese right, notice that there are some spaces in between the letters?
when to leave a space and when not to? the commas they use unlike the standard eigo one's, " , " its facing the other direction? ( noticed it in the worksheets i've been doing.
"kitto daijoubu ne" sounds right.

Are you trying to say that the ending 'desu' or 'masu' etc. are omitted sometimes? Rather than being omitted, they are changed to what we call plain form, which is used between close friends / in informal situations. I feel that it is best to stick to the textbook Japanese initially, and maybe at most use entire phrases you've heard before, but don't try to form your own informal sentences before you learn how to conjugate them.

When writing Japanese, there are spaces in your learning materials only because that is a beginner's book. Those spaces are put there to assist you in reading that whole chunk of hiragana/katakana and may exist only in children's books. Once you 'grow up' and advance to proper Japanese with Kanji, those spaces will disappear.

The commas are like this: 、
More like the 顿号、in Chinese.
Though in this strange part of Japan called Kagoshima where I am now, the prefectural government somehow insists on using , instead of 、in all their documents.

You can search for online Japanese-English dictionaries to check any words you're interested in learning. There're quite a few good ones out there.

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Old 23rd February 2010, 11:46 AM   #12 (permalink)
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Re: questions!!!! japanese language.

Originally Posted by JCMaths View Post
"kitto daijoubu ne" sounds right.

Are you trying to say that the ending 'desu' or 'masu' etc. are omitted sometimes? Rather than being omitted, they are changed to what we call plain form, which is used between close friends / in informal situations. I feel that it is best to stick to the textbook Japanese initially, and maybe at most use entire phrases you've heard before, but don't try to form your own informal sentences before you learn how to conjugate them.

When writing Japanese, there are spaces in your learning materials only because that is a beginner's book. Those spaces are put there to assist you in reading that whole chunk of hiragana/katakana and may exist only in children's books. Once you 'grow up' and advance to proper Japanese with Kanji, those spaces will disappear.

The commas are like this: 、
More like the 顿号、in Chinese.
Though in this strange part of Japan called Kagoshima where I am now, the prefectural government somehow insists on using , instead of 、in all their documents.

You can search for online Japanese-English dictionaries to check any words you're interested in learning. There're quite a few good ones out there.
ohhhhhh~!!!!!!!!!
omg thanks!!
thats really cleared most of my doubts(for now) LOL!
thank you thank you! ^_^
yeap, am relying on jisho.org now. XP!
you're in japan now? :O AWESOME!
LOL!
have been wanting to go there like......... -_-
lol. X)

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Old 23rd February 2010, 12:35 PM   #13 (permalink)
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Re: questions!!!! japanese language.

Originally Posted by beansproutbun View Post
ohhhhhh~!!!!!!!!!
omg thanks!!
thats really cleared most of my doubts(for now) LOL!
thank you thank you! ^_^
yeap, am relying on jisho.org now. XP!
you're in japan now? :O AWESOME!
LOL!
have been wanting to go there like......... -_-
lol. X)
No problem =) My Japanese friends who were learning mandarin in SG used to say I'd make a very good mandarin tutor coz I cleared up all their question-marks that their school teachers couldn't. Maybe I should try teaching Japanese too when I get back in Aug.
I'm working in Japan now in a very nice place called Kagoshima, southern part of Kyushu. Unfortunately, it isn't very accessible so few Singaporeans come here. Everyone always goes to only Tokyo, Kansai and Hokkaido. But I assure you it's worth coming =)
Keep the questions coming, I'm not so busy here XD

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Old 24th February 2010, 08:07 PM   #14 (permalink)
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Re: questions!!!! japanese language.

Originally Posted by JCMaths View Post
No problem =) My Japanese friends who were learning mandarin in SG used to say I'd make a very good mandarin tutor coz I cleared up all their question-marks that their school teachers couldn't. Maybe I should try teaching Japanese too when I get back in Aug.
I'm working in Japan now in a very nice place called Kagoshima, southern part of Kyushu. Unfortunately, it isn't very accessible so few Singaporeans come here. Everyone always goes to only Tokyo, Kansai and Hokkaido. But I assure you it's worth coming =)
Keep the questions coming, I'm not so busy here XD
i agree!!! (you make a really good teacher)
X]!!!!
i have one already. xP!
blueberry in japanese is....?
what about cheese, peanut and chocolate? >_<
haha! im kinda planning to go there alr, starting to save up now... T_T
hope i'll be able to go there earlier by joining singapore poly's student exchange club!! XD!!!
oh ya!
between boku and watashi, whats the difference?
boku is more informal, watashi is more polite kind?
asu and ashita = tomorrow. but....... different forms?!
.____.'''

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Old 25th February 2010, 10:09 PM   #15 (permalink)
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Re: questions!!!! japanese language.

i think boku is used more for guys, and watashi is a polite pronoun for men, but it's common for girls to use it, and some use atashi instead

some girls use boku too i guess

the issue about boku, ore and watashi applies more to men i guess....giving a nod to the issue of how male japanese learners tend to speak like women owning to the gender of their teacher

btw i think katakana can be used to point to a way how a person speaks it too....for example, japanese manga tend to depict foreigners' speech peppered with some katakana to show some mispronunciation or either a monotonous pronunciation of the word e.g. そうですネ (pronouncing 'ne' in a non-japanese manner)

it can also depict some puns e.g. a deathgod in a manga can say わたしデス!(the katakana for desu means death too...so it sounds like, 'i am death!')

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Old 26th February 2010, 07:17 AM   #16 (permalink)
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Re: questions!!!! japanese language.

Originally Posted by beansproutbun View Post
blueberry in japanese is....?
what about cheese, peanut and chocolate? >_<
These are most commonly just katakanized
ブルーベリー
チーズ
ピーナツ or ピーナッツ
チョコレート

Originally Posted by beansproutbun View Post
between boku and watashi, whats the difference?
boku is more informal, watashi is more polite kind?
asu and ashita = tomorrow. but....... different forms?!
.____.'''
As darkhonour said, boku is used by guys in informal situations. Some young girls also use it, but those are the more tomboyish girls. Girly girls will only use watashi/atashi. I'm assuming you're a guy, so you should use boku with your friends and watashi with your elders/strangers/teachers. Though nowadays students are so close to their teachers that some do use boku when talking to their teachers.

asu and ashita both mean tomorrow, but I'll generally only use ashita myself when speaking. asu to me is a formal written form, though I've heard a Japanese say it before in informal situations. Seems like it was part of his dialect to always use asu. You should be fine sticking to ashita, but keep asu in mind so that you can catch the meaning when it is spoken to you.

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Old 26th February 2010, 12:02 PM   #17 (permalink)
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Re: questions!!!! japanese language.

Originally Posted by JCMaths View Post
These are most commonly just katakanized
ブルーベリー
チーズ
ピーナツ or ピーナッツ
チョコレート



As darkhonour said, boku is used by guys in informal situations. Some young girls also use it, but those are the more tomboyish girls. Girly girls will only use watashi/atashi. I'm assuming you're a guy, so you should use boku with your friends and watashi with your elders/strangers/teachers. Though nowadays students are so close to their teachers that some do use boku when talking to their teachers.

asu and ashita both mean tomorrow, but I'll generally only use ashita myself when speaking. asu to me is a formal written form, though I've heard a Japanese say it before in informal situations. Seems like it was part of his dialect to always use asu. You should be fine sticking to ashita, but keep asu in mind so that you can catch the meaning when it is spoken to you.
omg..
thank you so much!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! ^____^
oh.....
how to say about two weeks in japanese?
i tried searching jisho.org,
the answer they gave was oyoso nishuukan ( my own translation, they gave some words in kanji ),
do we include oyoso "no" nishuukan?
my teacher said "no" was to connect two nouns, but apparently the definition of a noun is vey wide and
im kinda confused.
LOL?! x.x

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Old 1st March 2010, 03:01 PM   #18 (permalink)
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Re: questions!!!! japanese language.

Two week is just (二週間) (にしゅうかん)。 
http://jisho.org/words?jap=&eng=two+weeks&dict=edict

Where did you get the oyoso from?

Edit: I just found out it means roughly. So oyoso is a noun in that it means approximation. The entire oyoso no nishuukan translates literally to "approximation of two weeks". Hope this helps

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Old 1st March 2010, 03:07 PM   #19 (permalink)
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Re: questions!!!! japanese language.

Originally Posted by beansproutbun View Post
omg..
thank you so much!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! ^____^
oh.....
how to say about two weeks in japanese?
i tried searching jisho.org,
the answer they gave was oyoso nishuukan ( my own translation, they gave some words in kanji ),
do we include oyoso "no" nishuukan?
my teacher said "no" was to connect two nouns, but apparently the definition of a noun is vey wide and
im kinda confused.
LOL?! x.x
for me, it would be: nishuukan gurai, in hiragana it would be: にしゅうかんぐらい
nishuukan as in, 2 weeks, gurai as in, about.

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Old 1st March 2010, 03:28 PM   #20 (permalink)
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Re: questions!!!! japanese language.

Originally Posted by watisit View Post
Two week is just (二週間) (にしゅうかん)。 
http://jisho.org/words?jap=&eng=two+weeks&dict=edict

Where did you get the oyoso from?

Edit: I just found out it means roughly. So oyoso is a noun in that it means approximation. The entire oyoso no nishuukan translates literally to "approximation of two weeks". Hope this helps
noted! ;D
hm.
can you help me with the "no" part?
im kinda confused, like when to use it??
Boku no...
Watashi no......
?

Boku wa XXX-san no egao daisuki desu.
is this correct?
or is it,
Boku no XXX-san wa egao daisuki desu.
I will go with the first one, cause it sounds right to me........
but! any idea when to use the "no" ?
hm.
oh! what about "ga" ?
have heard my sensei using it.

anddddd!
LOL.
for some words, the "tsu" is not pronounced,
eg: itsukai ( first floor ), its pronounced as ikai.
how do i know when to pronounce them and when nt to? lLOL!

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